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Sarmoung
Elsewhere Radio Orchestrar / Flickr December 2008
 
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June 16th, 2008
Monday, June 16th, 2008 11:22 am

Photobucket

Hmm. Aesop's Fables? Terayama Shuji? For children? How could it go wrong? Thankfully, compared to some of Terayama's other work for kids, it doesn't stray too far from the original so kids can actually listen to it without fear of reprisal from parents anxious their children are being exposed to pornography or overly seditious influence.

The singer here is Tanaka Seiji, who was best known as a 70's folk-singing tv presenter for kids. Think Derek Griffiths or Brian Cant. Okay, that doesn't work for everyone. Never mind. Slight musical contributions from J.A. Caesar on tracks 4 and 7. Released in 1973 and the battery is going on the laptop...

I haven't translated the titles on the tags, but here's a translated tracklisting with the original Aesop fable when I've been able to work it out:

1. Prologue
2. The Story of the Meaty Bone (The Dog and the Bone)
3. The Spiteful Cat (The Cat and the Mice)
4. The Slandering Fox (The Fox and the Grapes?)
5. The Tortoise Who Couldn't Fly (The Tortoise and the Eagle)
6. Along Came A Wolf (The Boy Who Cried Wolf)
7. The Weasel in the Moonlight (The Bat and the Weasel?)
8. The Big Pig and the Little Pig (?)
9. Fox on Fire (The Farmer and the Fox)
10. The Ant and the Grasshopper
11. Epilogue

Terayama of course puts his own spin on these stories so, for example, rather than The Ant and the Grasshopper being a tale about how you should be prudent in putting something away for the possibly lean future, it instead comes across a story about bastard ants being unwilling to share their food for somebody who, as the grasshopper puts it, has been spending the whole summer singing for everyone else's benefit. So he dies and that's why there he doesn't sing in winter (or you can read it "that's why there are no songs in winter"). Which brings a tear to my eye.

It's here.

Tomorrow I'm off to see Miwa Akihiro in Kurotokage. Which I expect to be as camp and kitsch as Christmas. It's four hours long?!?

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